Time-limited methadone – guest blog by Paul Molyneux

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The topic of time-limited opioid prescriptions has been discussed before on Recovery Review. More recently, the issue has garnered increased attention after Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker wrote to the ACMD on behalf of the Inter-Ministerial Group on Drugs. In the letter, Norman Baker requested that the ACMD review “whether the evidence supports the case […]

What do clinicians make of addiction recovery?

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Which teachers were the best when you were at school? Likely the ones who believed in you, connected with you, who had a vision for where you could go and who enthusiastically helped you get there. The same characteristics are likely to define the best clinicians too. In a study, published a few days ago, […]

Naloxone as a bridge to recovery

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Yesterday at the Scottish Recovery Walk I spotted folk wearing Take Home Naloxone tee shirts. Recovery and harm reduction were on the march together, just as it should be. Jason Schwarz blogged last week, welcoming increasing availability of Naloxone in Michigan, but poses ‘the big question’: What comes after the overdose rescue? Are these people […]

Why recovery needs to embrace harm reduction

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Weave harm reduction in Despite my focus on recovery I have a strong harm reduction ethos at my core. Sure, I challenge services to be recovery-orientated, but I firmly believe that the reverse needs to be true. Rehabs and other services with a recovery goal ought to have harm reduction practices woven into their fabric. […]

Commissioning, harm reduction and recovery: a conversation

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The intent of the recovery-orientated drugs policies of the UK and Scottish Governments is to allow more people to find their way to lasting recovery. After years of a harm reduction focus, it’s understandable that it might take some time to build up an expertise and experience around recovery. While there can be little doubt […]

Methadone’s bad press

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There’s something odd about methadone. Well, maybe not so much about methadone, but about the way it’s seen. It gets bad press. Think back to lurid headlines in the Scottish tabloids a couple of years ago – the ones partially responsible for the Chief Medical Officer’s Expert Review on ORT. This is a paradox, for […]

Methadone and the Hall of Mirrors

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The International Journal of Drug Policy takes an editorial wander through the ‘hall of mirrors’ that is opioid replacement therapy pointing out that, depending on viewpoint, ORT can be seen as “a medical treatment; a method of harm reduction; an overdose prevention tactic; a crime reduction strategy; a public health measure; a social welfare intervention; an administrative […]

New psychoactive substances – mephedrone and violence

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Writing in Addiction Today, Prof Oscar D’Agnone cautions against buying in too much to how ‘legal highs’ are marketed. Even the more accepted term – new psychoactive substances (NPS) – is not really hitting the nail on the head, since the drugs are not all ‘new’ and many of the ‘new’ ones are very closely […]

Legal highs – not for human consumption

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Legal highs in Lothian The UK has the largest market for new psychoactive substances (NSP or “legal highs”) in Europe. Scotland is no stranger to them and, as a seminar in Edinburgh heard last week, the Lothian area is seeing a surge in demand, some worrying trends in injecting and significant new presentations due to problems […]

Population vs personalised care – two sides of a coin

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Writing on BMJ blogs, Muir Gray makes the case that any distinction between public health and clinical care is artificial – population vs personalised care are two sides of the same coin. He thinks of this in terms of value. For public health, benefits rise fast as investment increases, then there is a levelling out (the […]