Recovery in Primary Care – best practice

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Most opioid replacement prescribing takes place in primary care settings and the GP is powerfully placed to be a catalyst in the recovery journey. What if we placed prescribing at the heart of a fully recovery-oriented system of care? SMMGP highlights the Public Health England guidance, a supplement to previous guidance, which calls on all treatment providers to […]

Gabapentin abuse

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Gabapentin can be addictive. Search for gabapentin abuse or pregabalin abuse on Google Scholar and you’ll turn up 18,000 entries in less than a second. Pubmed is a little more specific finding 249 papers related to the subject. Vaults of Erowid has over 100 gabapentin and pregabalin ‘experiences’ detailed by users. I wrote a while back […]

Do AA & NA fit with methadone maintenance?

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  Given the dearth of research on NA populations this study from Bill White and colleagues is welcome. Knowing what we do already from the research on mutual aid groups, the researchers made the reasonable assumption that clients on ORT (opiate replacement therapy) attending 12-step mutual aid were likely to achieve to higher levels of abstinence (no […]

More benzodiazepines, more deaths

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Addiction & Recovery News highlights benzodiazepine related problems from two recent pieces of research. The first is about benzodiazepines and early death. The British Medical Journal reports on a UK General Practice study: We found evidence of an association between prescription of anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs and mortality over an average follow-up period of 7.6 […]

Legal Highs in Scotland: cause for concern

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Scotland is seeing a change in the pattern of drug use. Actually that’s putting it mildly – Scotland is seeing a potentially profound change in the pattern of drug use. New heroin use seems to be declining and the new kid on the block, Novel Psychoactive Substances (known as ‘legal-highs’) is carving out turf. I […]

Do opioids work for chronic pain? Sorry, we haven’t a clue

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Jason Schwartz highlights a Keith Humphreys post on the challenges of assessing opioids for long term non-cancer pain. With millions of people in the UK prescribed regular opiates on repeat prescriptions for chronic pain and these drugs fraught with dependence dangers, you’d think there would have to be a solid evidence base that they work. Not a bit […]

Not 12-step or SMART; 12-step AND SMART

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What value could there possibly be in getting people with social and brain impairment together to help each other without any sort of professional involvement? John F Kelly and Bill White suggest this could be interpreted as ‘the blind leading the blind.’As it turns out, there’s quite a bit of merit in mutual aid with […]

Sex & drugs in gay men (chemsex): what’s going on?

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Several pieces of research suggest that lesbian, gay and bisexual people have a higher risk of substance misuse problems and dependence. A few weeks ago we saw the publication of a piece of research looking at the context, harms and implications of the practice of ‘chemsex’ by examining a survey of over a thousand gay and bisexual men […]

Doctors with addictions: double standards?

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Doctors get addicted to alcohol and other drugs; there’s plenty of evidence of that. My question is: Do doctors with addictions get the same kind of treatment and outcomes as their patients?  The British Medical Association estimates that there are 10,000 to 13,000 addicted doctors in the UK. Most of them will be in practice. What […]