Technology and Recovery part 2 – guest blog by Glyn Davies

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Mobile Phone Technology and Recovery The recovery-oriented techniques we learn online do of course need to be put into practice as this is where we see real behaviour change. And it’s great to see the shift towards health-focussed apps. Over recent years there has been an acknowledgment that many who are digitally excluded from regularly […]

Technology and recovery part 1 – guest blog by Glyn Davies

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Technology and Substance Misuse Prevention For many who experience drug or alcohol related difficulties the first port of call will often be Google or another search engine to find a diagnosis or a directory of services. Access to the internet has transformed the ways in which we live our lives, particularly in terms of our […]

Methadone improves mental health; what’s next?

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Good to see some research from Aberdeen focusing on mental health in patients on methadone and other opiate replacement therapy. Academics in Primary Care conducted a systematic review looking at twenty-two studies where mental health had been assessed at baseline and again at follow up. What did they find? “Mental health significantly improved for all groups receiving […]

Time-limited methadone – guest blog by Paul Molyneux

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The topic of time-limited opioid prescriptions has been discussed before on Recovery Review. More recently, the issue has garnered increased attention after Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker wrote to the ACMD on behalf of the Inter-Ministerial Group on Drugs. In the letter, Norman Baker requested that the ACMD review “whether the evidence supports the case […]

Suboxone or Methadone – what do service users want?

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NHS North Lanarkshire asked 90 of their patients to give their viewpoints on what they thought of Suboxone vs. methadone for opioid replacement therapy (ORT). They found that ‘in comparison to methadone, patients receiving buprenorphine–naloxone were highly positive about their treatment experiences and its advantages over methadone, including the “clear-headed response”, improved well-being and concentration, possibility of […]

Recovery too hard? Methadone for life!

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Berlin, like many big cities, has a heroin problem. People presenting for help are being prescribed opioid replacement therapy (ORT) in greater numbers. That’s a good thing isn’t it? Well it depends on what you think is the end goal of treatment. At the start of this interesting recent German paper  “Why do patients stay in […]

Methadone’s bad press

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There’s something odd about methadone. Well, maybe not so much about methadone, but about the way it’s seen. It gets bad press. Think back to lurid headlines in the Scottish tabloids a couple of years ago – the ones partially responsible for the Chief Medical Officer’s Expert Review on ORT. This is a paradox, for […]

Does the GMC treat addicted doctors fairly?

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The General Medical Council, regulator of the UK’s doctors, has been getting a bit of a drubbing recently in terms of how it treats doctors who are not well. A hard-hitting Civitas report held the organisation to account over its own performance. The report was about regulation generally, but it touches on issues relevant to […]

“You’re all going to hate the word ‘recovery'”

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One of the problems with an aspirational and non-prescriptive definition of recovery is that it is hard to measure. The definitions most commonly featured in the literature share some elements including wellbeing or health, abstinence and citizenship. Clearly if you can’t define it precisely, then it’s hard to commission services to deliver on it. In […]

From opioid pills to heroin injecting

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SMMGP reviews research relevant to primary care in its July bulletin. Dr Euan Lawson covers a paper called  “Every ‘Never’ I Ever Said Came True”: Transitions from opioid pills to heroin injecting.  The paper studies those moving from prescription pill opioids (e.g. oxycodone) to heroin: People who had progressed to heroin from prescription opioids typically reported […]